A Johns Hopkins Childrens Center researcher reports in the July problem of Pediatrics.

In addition to asking about television viewing, the survey also addressed the amount of media exposure to video gaming and video watching. More than fifty % of all respondents were African-American, and a lot of the parents participating were moms. Co-authors of the scholarly study were Ruth A. Brenner, M.D., M.P.H., Patricia Moyer, B.S., and Malla R. Rao, M.Eng., Dr.P.H., of the National Institutes of Child Health insurance and Human Development; Joseph L. Wright, M.D., M.P.H., of the Children’s Analysis Institute, George Washington University College of Medicine, and the Children’s National INFIRMARY; and Hari Cheryl Sachs, M.D., of Coleman, Sachs, and Thillairajah Pediatrics.. 75 percent of parents admit their children still see televised violence at least one time a week More than half of most parents say they constantly limit what their kids see on TV, but almost three-quarters admit their children still see televised violence at least one time a week, a Johns Hopkins Children’s Center researcher reports in the July problem of Pediatrics.Institutes of Health. Individuals were randomly assigned to 1 of two types of acupuncture for eight weeks. One type targeted the internal wrists and legs below the knee – – factors shown to potentially lower blood circulation pressure in previous study. The other technique included the forearm and lower leg and led to no blood circulation pressure improvement, the researchers said. ‘A noticeable drop in blood circulation pressure was observed in 70 % of the sufferers treated at the effective factors, an average of 6 to 8 8 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure [the top number] and 4 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure [the lower amount],’ Longhurst said.